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PCB Designing

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  1. INTRODUCTION
    4 Topics
  2. CONDUCTOR AND CONDUCTIVE PATHS
    3 Topics
  3. ZERO PCB
  4. OVERVIEW OF ELECTRONICS
    4 Topics
  5. ACTIVITY 1
  6. CLASSIFICATION OF PCB
    2 Topics
  7. COMPOSITION OF PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD
  8. BRIEF ABOUT COPPER
  9. COLOR OF THE PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD
  10. ACTIVITY 2
  11. PCB DESIGNING
    2 Topics
  12. PCB DESIGNING SOFTWARE
    3 Topics
  13. ACTIVITY 3
  14. EAGLE OVERVIEW
    2 Topics
  15. PCB TERMINOLOGIES
    13 Topics
  16. ACTIVITY 4
  17. SCHEMATIC STUDY
    4 Topics
  18. ACTIVITY 5
  19. SCHEMATIC DESIGN
  20. ASSIGNMENT 1
    2 Topics
  21. ACTIVITY 6
  22. LAYOUT DESIGN
  23. Activity 7
  24. ROUTING
    5 Topics
  25. ASSIGNMENT 2
    1 Topic
  26. ROUTING RULES
    6 Topics
  27. ERC
    8 Topics
  28. DRC
    3 Topics
  29. ACTIVITY 8
  30. GROUND PLANE
  31. GERBER GENERATION
    4 Topics
  32. BILL OF MATERIAL
    1 Topic
  33. ACTIVITY 9
  34. PCB MANUFACTURING
  35. MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITY
  36. MISCLLANEOUS ASSIGNMENT
    1 Topic
Lesson 37, Topic 1
In Progress

COPPER

21/05/2024

COPPER

 

The next layer is a thin copper foil, which is laminated to the board with heat and adhesive. On common, double sided PCBs, copper is applied to both sides of the substrate. In lower cost electronic gadgets the PCB may have copper on only one side. 

 

Exposed Copper on PCB
 
PCB with copper exposed, no solder mask or silkscreen.
 
 

The copper thickness can vary and is specified by weight, in ounces per square foot. The vast majority of PCBs have 1 ounce of copper per square foot but some PCBs that handle very high power may use 2 or 3 ounce copper. Each ounce per square translates to about 35 micrometers or 1.4 thousandths of an inch of thickness of copper.

The most common unit of measure for the copper thickness on a printed circuit board is ounces (oz). But how thick is that? It’s the resulting thickness when 1 oz of copper is pressed flat and spread evenly over a one square foot area. This equals 1.37 mils (1.37 thousandths of an inch).

1 once = 35 micron = 1.4 mil